Level 2 Science - Science and Society (SAS201)

SAS201
Course Description

Teacher in Charge: M. Blackburn

Science and Society looks at the interactions between humankind decisions and how organisms adapt or do not adapt to the changes. It delves into the four Earth Spheres and how a balance needs to be maintained between them to have a stable Earth system.


Course Overview

Term 1
TOPIC 1
Investigate a pattern in an ecological community, with supervision - INTERNAL
Students visit Siren's Rock with the Year 12 Biology classes to gather primary data on rocky shore species.

TOPIC 2
Demonstrate understanding of adaptation of plants or animals to their way of life -INTERNAL
Adaptation involves the range of ways in which organisms have developed strategies to carry out the life processes. An adaptation refers to a feature and its function as it enables an organism to carry out a life process and thus occupy a specific ecological niche. It may include structural, behavioural, or physiological features of an organism. An adaptation provides an advantage for the organism in its specific habitat and ecological niche.
Way of life encompasses the ways in which an organism carries out all its life processes. It includes:
• relationships with other organisms – competition, predation, parasitism, mutualism
• reproductive strategies
• adaptations to the physical habitat.
Life processes are selected from:
• internal transport
• gas exchange
• transpiration
• nutrition
• excretion
• support and movement
• sensitivity and co-ordination
• reproduction.

Term 2
TOPIC 2 continued

TOPIC 3
Demonstrate understanding of advanced plant propagation techniques used for commercial production in New Zealand
Advanced plant propagation techniques are those associated with sexual propagation and asexual propagation through grafting, budding, and hormone treated cuttings or tissue culture.

Term 3
TOPIC 4
Investigate how organisms survive in an extreme environment - INTERNAL
An extreme environment includes deserts, Antarctic, space, volcano vents. Students research the conditions of the environment selected and look at the adaptive features the animal or plant has to survive in that environment.

TOPIC 5
Education for Sustainability 2.2 - Explain how human activity in a biophysical environment has consequences for a sustainable future
A sustainable future requires the development of ways of thinking and acting to meet the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations (of all living things) to meet their own needs. In Aotearoa New Zealand, a sustainable future reflects, wherever possible, consideration of Māori concepts and values relating to the environment, which may vary between hapū and between iwi.
Consequences for a sustainable future are the result of human activity that promotes or disrupts the sustainability of an environment.
A biophysical environment relates to the interactions between a physical environment and the biological life forms within the environment. The biophysical environment could be a natural environment or a built environment, or some combination of the two. The physical environment may be a geological, atmospheric, hydrological or climatic system.
An environment refers to a definable area such as a stream, estuary, bush, urban community, national park, business, home or farm.
Human activity refers to activities that change the biophysical environment, for example: land use; industrial development; transport; housing; waste management; recreation; tourism; establishment of marine reserves; energy production and consumption; extractive industries such as fishing, mining or forestry; water use or introduction of exotic species.

Term 4
TOPIC 5 Continued

Contributions and Equipment/Stationery

1x1B8 exercise book


Recommended Prior Learning

Open entry to all students not entered in any other Level 2 science course.


Credit Information
Assessment
Level
Internal or
External
Credits
L1 Literacy Credits UE Literacy Credits Numeracy Credits
A.S. 90811 v3 Education for Sustainability 2.2 - Explain how human activity in a biophysical environment has consequences for a sustainable future
2
I
4
Y
4r
A.S. 91155 v2 Biology 2.3 - Demonstrate understanding of adaptation of plants or animals to their way of life
2
I
3
Y
A.S. 91158 v2 Biology 2.6 - Investigate a pattern in an ecological community, with supervision
2
I
4
Y
A.S. 91190 v2 Earth and Space Science 2.4 - Investigate how organisms survive in an extreme environment
2
I
4
Y
A.S. 91291 v2 Agricultural and Horticultural Science 2.3 - Demonstrate understanding of advanced plant propagation techniques used for commercial production in New Zealand
2
I
4
Y
Total Credits

Total Credits Available: 19 credits.
Internally Assessed Credits: 19 credits.