Technology

Technology is a practical-based subject that uses the design process to design, create and evaluate new products. Adaptation and innovation are at the heart of the technology subject area. Quality outcomes result from thinking and practices that are informed, critical, and creative.

As part of engaging in the technology process, students

  • examine the practice of others
  • develop a range of outcomes, including concepts, plans, briefs and models
  • investigate issues and trends in the community
  • learn to consider ethics, sustainability, and the needs of specific stakeholders and potential impacts on the environment

Technology is never static. It is influenced by and in turn impacts on the cultural, ethical, environmental, political, and economic conditions of the day.

Technology at Sacred Heart College provides students with rich and varied learning experiences in the areas of Home Economics, Design & Visual Communication, Digital Technology, and Fashion & Design Technology, to problem solve through practical activities.


Fashion & Design Technology

Fashion & Design Technology is offered at every year level. Students develop their creativity and problem solving skills in a well-resourced practical environment with a focus on carefully planned and well-designed products using soft materials.

Senior courses are designed to provide students with the opportunity to work with a client and construct a wide range of garments and textile items using soft materials for both themselves and others, including charity groups.

Through engagement in Fashion & Design Technology, students are encouraged to develop effective communication and time management skills, the ability to work both independently and as a member of a group to create quality practical outcomes and have the opportunity to enjoy their experiences in this subject.

Food & Nutrition - Home Economics

Home Economics is relevant, challenging, enjoyable, interesting, and useful.  As a subject it provides meaningful and real-life learning experiences for students. Students will develop an understanding of how their food choices affect their wellbeing. They learn about the actions necessary to improve their own wellbeing and that of their family and community in New Zealand.

Through the process of selecting, preparing, cooking and serving food, students develop their creativity and experience a sense of accomplishment. At the same time they develop skills that contribute to their well-being.

Food Technology focusses on developing knowledge and skills about the use of ingredients to process, preserve, pack and store products.

Home Economics creates vocational and learning pathways for future nutritionists, dietitians, policy advisors, early childhood educators, home economics teachers, health practitioners, food technologists, food writers, food stylists, researchers, food product developers, chefs, hotel management and sport nutritionists.

Design & Visual Communication

Graphics and design students have the opportunity to gain credits by exploring ideas through design practice.  Drawing, including freehand and technical drawing and the use of computer graphics packages are essential tools to depict and clarify students' ideas and proposed solutions.

Through design-based activities students develop reasoning and decision making skills, explore what it means to be a designer, understanding social and human needs, recognise their own and others' values, investigate historical perspectives, examine issues of sustainability, use all kinds of new technologies to communicate their ideas effectively and above all, enjoy learning.

Digital Technology

Staff:  Amber McIntosh (HOD), Dianne Tennent

The NEW Digital Technologies Curriculum

We are currently undergoing exciting changes as the Ministry of Education has launched a new Digital Technology Curriculum.

“All young people from years one to 10 will take part in digital technologies learning. Students choosing digital technologies pathways for NCEA will develop the more specialised skills that industry partners say are in high demand, through new achievement standards being developed for NCEA Levels 1, 2 and 3.” Minister for Education

Digital Technologies is learning about technology. It involves learning to be a creator in the digital world, not just learning to use systems. Our pupils won’t just be using devices like computers and smartphones. The changed curriculum will mean we will be teaching our young people the computer science principles all digital technologies are built on. Your child will benefit from having these future thinking skills.

The new digital technology content covers two key areas, computational thinking and designing and developing digital outcomes, and has been designed to be flexible, so it can respond to new developments and technologies as they emerge.

Computational thinking is about understanding the computer science principles that underlie all digital technologies, and learning how to develop instructions, such as programming, to control these technologies.

Designing and developing digital outcomes is about understanding that digital systems and applications are created for humans by humans, and developing knowledge and skills in using different digital technologies to create digital content across a range of digital media. This part of the curriculum also includes learning about the electronic components and techniques used to design digital devices.

"Digital fluency is about using a digital system effectively. It means understanding how to use digital technologies, deciding when to use specific digital technologies to achieve a desired outcome, and being able to explain why the technologies selected will provide their desired outcome.

Digital technologies involves computational thinking – learning to be a creator in the digital world, not just learning to use systems. Digital Technologies is not about learning with technology (e-learning), it's learning about technology.

Both are important, but if we teach students only to use digital devices, they will be consumers limited to making do with whatever the makers of digital technologies produce, and as a country we will be buying in technology rather than creating it and selling it to others." Professor Tim Bell (University of Canterbury)